Exabytes: Documenting the ‘digital age’ and huge growth in computing capacity

Megabytes are dead.

Gigabytes are passe.

So much digital data now moves around the globe that those who endeavor to measure it employ a new – or new to non-nerds – term.

Meet the exabyte.

How much data is an exabyte? It’s a billion gigabytes – and it signifies just how digital and data-intensive the world has become.

In 2007, the global capacity to store digital information – on computer hard disks, smartphones, CDs and other digital media – totaled 276 exabytes, a new report finds.

How much is that? Imagine a stack of CDs – each holding an album’s worth of digital music – shooting from the top of your desk to 50,000 miles beyond the moon.

But not everyone has equal access to those resources. In fact, the digital gap between rich and poor countries appears to be growing, said Martin Hilbert of the University of Southern California, who led the audacious effort to tally all of civilization’s information and computing power.

In 2002, people in developed countries had access to eight times the bandwidth – or information-carrying capacity – of people in poorer nations, Hilbert said, citing data he will publish soon. By 2007, that gap had almost doubled.

 

“If we want to understand the vast social changes underway in the world, we have to understand how much information people are handling,” Hilbert said.

To address that question, Hilbert and co-author Priscila Lopez spent four years poring over 1,110 sources of information spanning from 1986 to 2007, including sales data from computer and cellphone makers and the music and movie industries.

In 1986, a year after digital CDs widely debuted, vinyl records still accounted for 14 percent of all data on Earth, with audiocassettes holding an additional 12 percent.

 

 

Advertisements

About Teknovation

Welcome to the technical committee of Computer Science,ABES Eng. College... It is a platform where you can show your INNOVISION...
This entry was posted in Latest News. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s